How We Saved $1,454 on Our Property Taxes, Part 2

22 Sep

Earlier this year, Corey successfully protested the tax valuation of our investment properties – this series shares his experiences and lessons learned along the way. The information below is definitely Texas-specific, and possibly county-specific, so please take caution when applying it to your local area.

Step 1 – File a Notice to Protest
After reviewing our tax appraisal notice, we needed to schedule a hearing with the Appraisal Review Board. Form 50-132 requested owner information, property details, asked us to declare the reason(s) for our protest.

Notice-of-Protest-Reasons Checked v2

Our reasons would determine what evidence could be presented at the hearing. We wanted to get our hands on the appraisal district’s documentation first, but we couldn’t do that until after the protest form was filed. The solution: check both over market value and value is unequal to give us the most flexibility later.

Make a notation if you’d prefer an evening/weekend slot (if available). Be sure to make a copy of the completed form before you turn it in – you’ll need it in Step 2.

Tip: protesting multiple properties in the same appraisal district?
File Form 50-131 to schedule the hearings on the same day.

Step 2 – Request the Appraisal District’s Evidence
Next, we sent a separate letter (template below) requesting the documentation the chief appraiser will use at the hearing to justify our valuation. This provides 2 HUGE advantages for the property owner:

  1. At least 2 weeks to review the appraisal district’s rationale for the valuation, and prepare any counter-arguments.
  1. The evidence the appraisal district can introduce at the hearing is now restricted to only those materials.

We would be provided different documents depending on whether we protested market value (comparable sales report) or unequal appraisal (equity comparable report) – another reason to check both boxes when you file!

Next Appraisal Protest Post: Compiling Your Evidence

[Month DD, YYYY]

Via Hand Delivery
[Name], Chief Appraiser
[Name] County Appraisal District
[Address]
[City], [ST] [Zip Code]

Re: Request for property appraisal information at [Property Address], [City], [State] [Zip Code] (account #) Property [#]

Dear Sir/Madam:

Enclosed please find the Property Tax – Notice of Protest Form 50-132 regarding the above described improved real property.

Additionally, pursuant to section 41.461 of the Texas Property Tax Code, please provide a copy of the data, schedules, formulas and all other information the chief appraiser plans to introduce at the hearing to establish any matter at issue.

It is my understanding that information, “not made available to the protesting party at least 14 days before the scheduled or postponed hearing may not be used as evidence in the hearing,” according to 41.67(d) of the Texas Property Tax Code.

Please notify me when a copy of the above referenced information is available and I will make arrangements to pick it up and remit payment for it.

Sincerely,

[Signature]

[Name]

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2 Responses to “How We Saved $1,454 on Our Property Taxes, Part 2”

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  1. How We Saved $1,454 on Our Property Taxes, Part 4 | Rental Realities - December 16, 2014

    […] of our appraisal protest series. Previous posts include: Receiving Our Notice of Appraised Value, Filing a Notice to Appeal and Requesting Supporting Documentation, and Compiling the […]

  2. How We Saved $1,454 on Our Property Taxes, Part 3 | Rental Realities - December 16, 2014

    […] Corey received our appraised value and filed our notice to protest, it was time to compile any value-supporting data. Below are some places to start, and a notation […]

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